The World Broke In Two By Bill Goldstein

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*Thank you to Picador for letting me review this novel.

Rating: 4/5

The World Broke in Two tells the story of 1922 by focusing on four legendary writers: Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, and D.H. Lawrence, who were all similarly and serendipitously moved during that remarkable year to invent the language of the future.”

This is a story about four writers who were struggling to write anything meaningful in the year of 1922. They did not know if their work would succeed or if they would ever finish. They saw the success of Ulysses and Marcel Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past and how this impacted the literary world. And they wondered when it would be their turn to create a work that would be talked about for generations to come.

At the end of the year, each writer would be working on a project that would make them successful. Woolf started her work on Mrs. Dalloway. Forster had gone back to writing Passage to India. Lawrence began Kangaroo. And Eliot finished The Waste Land.

Each writer had to overcome obstacles in 1922, so they could start or finish their masterpieces. And they did just that.

Bill Goldstein did extensive research in libraries and in archives to put this historical novel together. He sought out each writer in historical works and figured out how 1922 impacted their literary career. He did an outstanding job with recreating the drama and passion that each writer had within themselves. I recommend this to anyone who loves to read and would appreciate what these writers went through to become literary sensations.

Links to buy this novel:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-world-broke-in-two-bill-goldstein/1124361561?ean=9781250182500#/

 

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